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Speak English

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sexta-feira, 9 de setembro de 2016

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sexta-feira, 22 de abril de 2016

Speak English

Atenção!


Visto que  página do Face Speak English está com 260 visualizações até o presente momento, ela irá oferecer um curso de inglês (via Skype) for free ao tricentésimo curtidor dessa página (pelo prazo de 30 dias)!

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quarta-feira, 8 de julho de 2015

some of the advantages of the place where I live

Cordovil, which is the place where I live here in Rio is not as good as the other neighborhoods.
Ana, who lives in an apartment with me, has been my wife for 3 years.
Never go to houses whose owners you don't know.

Marcello called Cristiane after she had finished her dinner.
Although complained about lots of assignments, master students can handle the situation.
The whole city was saddened when Leandro died.

Continue

Although adverb subordinate clauses contain at least one subject and one verb, they begin with words that make them dependent. In other words, these clauses have to be attached to independent clauses that provide additional information in order for them to make sense.
Let’s look at some examples:
  • Because it might rain, I will bring an umbrella to the festival.
  • Although your mother doesn’t like him, she must admit that he plays the piano beautifully.
  • Whenever we leave the beach at dinner time, we get pizza at the brewery.
  • Unless you would rather ride by yourself, we should drive home together. 
  • So that you don’t have to pay a fine, you better not park in front of that fire hydrant.
  • After she finished the interview, Emma felt relieved.

  • For each of the above, notice how we have answered a potential question the reader might ask. Adverb clauses will describe the verb and add detail to your sentences. In the first example above, the adverb clause clarifies why Fiona is “bringing” the umbrella. Also, when you learn about the four sentence types, you will discover that adverb clauses create a unique type of sentence.
    You should consider keeping a list of these subordinating conjunctions as you write so that you can begin to work these into your sentences. As you use them, they will become a natural part of your writing style.

    Placement and Punctuation of Adverb Subordinate Clauses:

    Adverb Subordinate Clauses require a comma if they are placed before the main clause. You are free to place an adverb subordinate clause before or after the main clause. Here are some examples:
    • Because it might rain, I will bring an umbrella to the festival. (comma)
    • I will bring an umbrella to the festival because it might rain. (no comma)
       
    • Whenever we leave the beach at dinner time, we get pizza at the brewery.
    • We get pizza at the brewery whenever we leave the beach at dinner time.
       
    • Unless you would rather ride by yourself, we should drive home together.
    • We should drive home together unless you would rather ride by yourself.
       
    • So that you don’t have to pay a fine, you better not park in front of that hydrant!
    • You better not park in front of that hydrant so that you don’t have to pay a fine!
       
    • After she finished the interview, Emma felt relieved.
    • Emma felt relieved after she finished the interview.

    In each of the examples, notice how the adverb subordinate clauses can go either before or after the main sentence. The rule is simply to place a comma after the clause if it precedes the main sentence, but generally to omit the comma if it appears after the main sentence.
    Which of the versions of sentences above do you prefer? Which placement (before or after) gets your attention and produces a strong sentence? Your answers to these questions will help you to begin to think about your writing style.
    For greater emphasis, many writers will place adverb subordinate clauses at the beginning of their sentences rather than after. This is also true of many arguments when writers qualify their position before stating their main argument.
    To review, there are two rules to remember when punctuating adverb subordinate clauses:
  1. If the clause is at the beginning of the sentence, use a comma after the clause.
  2. If the clause is at the end of the sentence, you will generally not use a comma.
There is, however, an exception to rule #2:
If the clause comes at the end of the sentence and is contrasting or contradictory, then you insert a comma. For example:
  • He cleaned the kitchen, whereas his roommate sat on the couch eating pizza.
In this case, you use a comma because the clause comes at the end of the sentence and is also a contradictory idea.

Adverb Subordinate Clauses:


In order to add concrete detail and to construct more elaborate sentences, you will need to learn about and use adverbial subordinate clauses. Adverb subordinate clauses, as the name suggests, will modify a verb by describing how, when, why, where, or under what condition something is happening or someone is doing an action. Note that these clauses, like adjective subordinate clauses, will not stand on their own. Rather, they will be added to a sentence to provide additional description and information. However, adverb subordinate conjunctions are easy to spot and use. The most noticeable characteristic of adverb subordinate clauses is that they will begin with one of the subordinate conjunctions that you learned about in Unit 2. Here is the list again:
Cause or
Effect
Concession Condition Comparison
or Contrast
Purpose Space or Time
as
because
since
though
although
even though
even if
if
since
unless
when
whenever
while
as
rather than
in order that
so that
before
since
once
after
while
when
until
Subordinating Conjunctions signal dependent clauses. You learned about subordinating conjunctions in Unit 2, so take a look at the list again:
Cause or
Effect
Concession Condition Comparison
or Contrast
Purpose Space or Time
as
because
since
though
although
even though
even if
if
since
unless
when
whenever
while
as
rather than
in order that
so that
before
since
once
after
while
when
until

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